Tuesday, January 1, 2013

Tradition can also stimulate the imagination...

Happy New Year to all my friends of Blogger, Facebook, Snooth, Pinterest and Twitter... All of the FRIENDS with whom we have shared some great moments... 
With all my heart THANK YOU!

Source of photo: fotolia


It 's strange that the majority of Italians in North America originally come from Southern Italy, but the wines from there are sitting in relative obscurity.

Adding insult to injury, the food that most North Americans eat relies on the Italian cuisine from this part of the country.

The pizza as we know it originated in Naples, like the tomato sauce coming from warmer climates, where they grow tomatoes.  Due to the heat, they also use dried pasta that keeps better than pasta made ​​with eggs, which is found mostly in Northern Italy.

While the foods of Southern Italy 
populate the menus of Italian restaurants in North America, southern wines do not enjoy the same popularity...


Tradition can also stimulate the imagination... (of my wife)!

Today on New Year's Day she prepared a "Butterball" turkey for dinner. It was cooked with stuffing, in order to make the meat more unctuous over low heat and was sprinkled with its juices frequently enough for it not to dry out.

It was served with 

homemade 
mashed potatoes and carrots

the 
remaining 
cooking juices 
and stuffing

This turkey was very juicy and delicious! 
It was not dry at all. 
It is a tradition of the holiday season, our family loves it!




I decided on the wine, from Southern Italy. 


Roccamora 2006 Negroamaro Nardò 

D.O.C. - Red from Puglia (Apulia)
Grapes: Negroamaro 100% 
Alcohol content: 13,5% vol.
Winemaker's notes:








Bouquet: a flowery scent blends with crunchy ripe red fruits in a curious dynamism. Irish and violet go well together with currant, blueberries and sour cherries.




Flavour: on the palate, its sheer and light enjoyment, helps to spread fruitfulness in a good tasting persistency. It’s an easy –drinking wine .on the palate, a snappy character stresses its lively tone.

"The Wine Advocate", 90 points of 100.